Tuesday, February 23, 2021

February Articles of Interest

Petite Wedding Bouquets That Make a Big Statement


While we'll always be big fans of wild, cascading bouquets, we've noticed that more and more brides are opting for smaller-scale arrangements. This is particularly true for brides affected by the coronavirus pandemic, who have had to adjust their wedding plans for a smaller guest list and new budget. These mini clutches can range from a single stem to a collection of tiny blooms. But don't be fooled by their smaller stature—although minute, these posies still make a big impact down the aisle. In fact, we think their small size is what makes them so eye-catching.

Read more here.
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Rare pink flannel flowers bloom in Australia


The blossoms grow in eastern Australia, from the Blue Mountains to north-eastern Victoria. Their seeds can lay dormant for years, requiring exactly the right conditions to germinate – a year after bushfire followed by rainfall.

Read more here.
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The Flower Fields Will Reopen in March,
With New Guidelines


AROUND THE TIME WHEN THE POPPIES... of the Antelope Valley arrive, but a little after the desert's wildflower show begins, and near the moment when wisteria starts to add a purple-lush beauty to some of California's grandest formal gardens, a petal-packed place in Carlsbad gets colorful. Very, very colorful, thanks to vast carpets composed solely Giant Tecolote Ranunculus flowers, those giant-headed, eye-wowza beauties that pop in an assortment of reds, oranges, yellows, and pinks. It's The Flower Fields we're talking about, the venerable attraction that includes opportunities to stroll by the famous cultivated blooms, as well as other events in years gone by, from sunset dining to live music.

Read more here.

Saturday, February 20, 2021

Women’s Day 2021


Did you know the first Women’s Day was celebrated in 1909 when the Socialist Party of America marched on the streets of New York, to pay tribute to garment workers who had protested against poor working conditions the year before? Every year since then, on the 8th of March the world unites to support, raise, inspire and motivate women. The purpose of this day is to focus on themes such as inspiring change, recognition of women in the arts, or the importance of education and career opportunities. This year’s theme: “Let’s all choose to challenge”… which focuses on the importance of defying biases and misconceptions in the interest of creating a more inclusive and gender-equal world.

The UN also announced a 2021 theme: “Women in leadership: Achieving an equal future in a COVID-10 world.” This theme applauds the efforts of women who are striving to create a more equal future and COVID-19 pandemic recovery.

Feeling inspired and wondering how you can celebrate Women's Day? We have a few ideas:


  • With Flowers, of course! It doesn't matter if you are a man or a woman to join in on the celebration - it is perfectly acceptable for a man to give flowers to the women in his life, as well as, women to share flowers with their friends, family and co-workers. 
  • Learn why the day is important. As women's accomplishments, particularly those that have to do with the home (raising children, educating, cleaning, cooking, etc.) are often ignored and overlooked. This day helps to remind people of the important things that women do every day. 
  • Help raise awareness. Mention that it's Women's Day to people you know, your family, your coworkers, your friends. Discuss with them why it's an important day and why it's important to treat women with respect and to acknowledge their contributions to society.


This year’s hashtags also include: #WomensDay, #ChooseToChallenge, the straightforward #IWD2021, #InternationalWomensDay, and #SeeHer.

Monday, February 15, 2021

Capture the Colors of Mardi Gras: Purple, Green & Gold


Are you ready to celebrate Mardi Gras? Did you know part of what makes this New Orleans event fun includes adding some color to your life? The traditional colors of Mardi Gras are purple, green, and gold. If you venture to New Orleans for Mardi Gras, you will see variations of these colors everywhere, from large Christmas-like decorations to the beads that people wear and how the New Orleanians decorate their homes. These colors have been around since 1892 and are part of this pre-Lenten celebration that ends on Mardi Gras (which is French for Fat Tuesday).

One of the wonderful things about a ‘color-based’ celebration like Mardi Gras is that as long as you use the traditional colors, you can make just about any kind of design and it will feel like Mardi Gras. Yes, the joie de vivre doesn’t have to be confined to only this region of the country. You can join in and capture the flavor of New Orleans from wherever you are. So, get ready to turn up the music, simmer the Gumbo, arrange the flowers… and let the good times roll.






When creating Mardi Gras floral décor, you don’t have to make it a specific way. It can be as simple as a few colorful vases with a mixture of flowers and foliage, a large centerpiece or even a bountiful wreath. The main thing is to use hues of purple, green, and gold and then let your imagination run wild!

Friday, January 29, 2021

January Articles of Interest

IN THE GARDEN
Tricks to grow proteas away from their home


Growing proteas, pincushions and leucodendrons is a challenge in our part of the country, as the care you render to your usual garden plants here is rejected by the protea family.

For instance, feeding proteas with fertiliser as you would any other plant may be likened to letting a child loose in a sweet store. Unlike other plants the protea plant cannot control its uptake of nutrients - gorging itself to the detriment of the plant growth and sometimes leading to its demise.

Read more here.
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5 flower trends expected to surge in popularity in 2021


'Receiving or giving flowers and making your home beautiful will continue to be important next year,' says Larry Walshe, celebrity London florist and founder of Bloom.

'Following two national lockdowns, we have all learned that flowers are not just a luxury, but rather a necessity that bring joy, pleasure and a boost to wellbeing. The use of plants and flowers in the home is beneficial for both our physical and mental health, thanks to the air-purifying qualities of blooms and their ability to help reduce stress and anxiety.'

Take a look at the flower trends set to surge in popularity...

Read more here.
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Valentine’s Day Traditions from Around the World


The 24 hours of affection known as Valentine’s Day originated in Europe more than 1,500 years ago as a Christian feast commemorating the martyrdom of Rome’s St. Valentinus. However, the earliest known mention of Feb. 14 as an actual celebration of love occurs in 1375 AD within medieval poet Geoffrey Chaucer’s Parliament of Foules, a work that cites the 14th as the day both birds and humans are most likely to find mates.

American Valentine’s Day expressions of endearment include everything from greeting cards, love letters, and heart-shaped chocolates to a dozen roses, teddy bears, and balloons. It’s a day of marriage proposals, weddings, and nights dining out. But the United States isn’t the only country to celebrate romance. Nations around the world have spent centuries developing their own unique ways to mark love’s holiday. Here’s how some countries across the globe celebrate the day of love.

Read more here.

Wednesday, January 27, 2021

For the Love of Texture


A couple bunches of Berzelia or ‘Buttonbush’… is all you need for that occasional texture fix. This ‘other-worldly’ botanical is a BIG favorite of ours here on the farm. For all the visual impact these bobbles offer, their unique element of texture not only appeals to your sense of sight, but also to your tactile senses as well. Whether it is Berzelia Lanuginosa or Red Jelly, these small, round buttons are engaging, making you want to just reach out and touch them.




Berzelia, is one of approximately eight species found in the Bruniaceae family, one of the few families that is endemic to the Cape Floral Kingdom. It is a wonderful evergreen shrub that grows naturally in the wild from the northwestern to the southwestern parts of the Western Cape.

Berzelia can grow to more than 4 feet tall. Its branches are long, slender and straight. It has soft, fern-like foliage that surrounds the entire stem from top to bottom in a spiral-like design. The flowers are often massed in spherical heads and range in colors from creamy white to several shades of green, yellow and some varieties are even two-toned. Berzelia flowers from winter through spring. Then after flowering, it develops attractive, creamy white seeds that can remain on the shrub for at least one to two years. This wonderful botanical has become extremely popular among designers throughout the world for its exotic appearance and fabulous texture which compliments a range of stylist moods.


Friday, January 22, 2021

Creating Healthy Connections Through Flowers


Gather all things cheerful and bright! Quarantine hasn’t been easy, and it has definitely taken a toll on all of us. To feel better, we need to take action to keep our minds, bodies and businesses healthy. Having a positive mental attitude is number one, but the objects that surround us are vital too.

Flowers are not only a NATURAL remedy to help revitalize and balance our moods, but they also have so many other wonderful benefits.

Flowers connect people with nature. You’ve heard the saying, “stop and smell the roses.” While it might seem a bit cliché, it is advice actually worth taking, particularly when life feels chaotic. Flowers trigger the release of endorphins, the brain’s “happy” chemicals, which help you relax and make you feel more comfortable. Interacting with nature also has a positive effect on physical health. Considering the harmful effects that stress can have on the body, that old saying might be a bit more meaningful than you think.


Flowers are nature’s coaches… their care teach vital life skills, such as dependability, time management, creative thinking + self-awareness. Beyond their unspoken teaching talents, flowers are excellent entertainers too. Nurturing a garden or creating arrangements (for instance), are fun activities that are appropriate for just about everyone.


Flowers bridge the gap created by the need for physical distancing now being experienced between family, friends and co-workers. As stay at home measures keep once-normal gatherings to a minimum, floral gifts have reconnected individuals, allowing for the celebration of many missed moments.


Flowers with their own special meaning, serve as a ‘silent’ language. Bits of this tradition still remain used today, with certain varieties expressing feelings like love, friendship and gratitude. When words are not enough, flowers can help convey heartfelt emotion… such as red roses and tulips to declare affection, or proteas to express strength, courage and the ability to overcome obstacles.


Fortunately, no one needs a reason to ask if they deserve flowers, the answer will always be YES!

Sunday, January 17, 2021

10 Yellow Inspired Protea Designs


Hello Yellow… Pantone has spoken! The color of the year is always a fun headline to look forward to every January. According to Leatrice Eiseman, Executive Director of the Pantone Color Institute, "The hue of yellow, called Illuminating (one of two colors selected for 2021), will help to fill people with energy, clarity and hope to conquer the continuing uncertainty, spirited and emboldening shades satisfy our quest for vitality. Illuminating is a bright and cheerful yellow sparkling with vivacity, a warming yellow shade imbued with solar power."

Yellow has historically been used to kindle joy and inspired positivity. Plus, nature is where color begins, after all... and no color is more a representative of nature than bright yellow. In the natural world, yellow is the color of sunflowers and daffodils, bananas and lemons, bees, numerous birds and many of our favorite Leucospermum and Leucadendron. In nearly every culture on earth, yellow represents sunshine, happiness, and warmth.

Looking through our collection of yellow floral creations, we have several examples where we have used yellow as the principal color in each design.










There is no doubt yellow sparks a broad spectrum of emotions in all of us. While it can be playful and radiant, it can also be unforgiving and ominous, which makes it a wildly fascinating hue. The many facets of the color yellow reveal its extremely impactful spirit.