Thursday, February 27, 2020

February Articles of Interest

The Flower Fields Brim With Blossom-Adjacent Events


YOU CAN TALK TO FLOWERS, and plenty of gardeners do, but you really can't make demands. You can politely request that the petal-rocking specimens start to grow, or grow faster, or grow bigger, but flowers? They have a rather predictable if wonderful way of keeping to their own schedule. Which is all to say this: There is a schedule at the famous Flower Fields in Carlsbad Ranch and... there really isn't. The schedule part of that somewhat contradictory statement? The iconic attraction, which is known for sporting thousands of Giant Tecolote ranunculus blooms each spring, blooms that boast the most astounding colors, opens Sunday, March 1. And there's already a closing date on the 2020 calendar: It's Mother's Day, which is Sunday, May 10. There's your firm, set-in-soil schedule, but here's the truth: The flowers will open at their own pace.

Read more here.
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Protea Wedding Bouquets


Protea plants, also known as sugarbushes, have become a favorite in the wedding world. The blooms—which are native to South Africa—come in a number of different varieties, and each is beloved for its unique shape or color. These include the big king protea, the unusual pincushion protea, and the aptly-named blushing bride protea. Whichever you like, we recommend incorporating it into your wedding bouquet for a bold and beautiful arrangement. For inspiration, look no further than these unique protea wedding bouquet ideas.

Read more here
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Pincushion Protea Wedding Feast at Cheerio Gardens


At one stage when I was creating South Bound Bride I considered giving it a name with ‘protea’ in the title. Not that I ever came up with a good one, but it would have been pretty darn appropriate since as you know, we loooove proteas around these here parts. Today we’re talking pincushions, with a wedding that uses these beautifully unusual blooms against lush greenery and soft charcoal for their bright pops of orange colour, and boy does it ever work! Add in elegant rustic style elements – slate boards, wooden tables, chalkboard signage – and you have yourself a real pretty party! And then with Charl Van Der Merwe‘s lovely pics… well, see Derek and Jana’s big day for yourself – and enjoy!

Read more here.

Monday, February 24, 2020

Women's Day 2020


Did you know the first Women’s Day was celebrated in 1908 when a group of women marched on the streets of New York, demanding their rights? Since then every year on the 8th of March the world unites to support, raise, inspire and motivate women. The purpose of this day is to focus on various themes such as inspiring change, recognition of women in the arts, or the importance of education and career opportunities. This year’s theme: I am Generation Equality: Realizing Women’s Rights. It’s a call-to-action for each one of us can help create a gender equal world. Let's all be #EachforEqual.




If you’re feeling inspired and wondering how you can celebrate Women's Day… we have a few ideas:
  • With Flowers, of course! It doesn't matter if you are a man or a woman to join in on the celebration - it is perfectly acceptable for a man to give flowers to the women in his life, as well as, women to share flowers with their friends, family and co-workers.
  • Learn why the day is important. As women's accomplishments, particularly those that have to do with the home (raising children, cleaning, cooking, etc.) are often ignored and overlooked. This day helps to remind people of the important things that women do every day.
  • Help raise awareness. Mention that it's Women's Day to people you know, your family, your coworkers, your friends. Discuss with them why it's an important day and why it's important to treat women with respect and to acknowledge their contributions to society.


Saturday, February 22, 2020

Where the Leucospermum Grow


Fields of leucospermum or more commonly called “pincushions” sway in the breeze blowing through the hills, creating a vibrant welcome mat for those who venture up into Rainbow Crest. These vibrant red, orange, peach, yellow and bi-colored flowering heads are formed mainly with long, sprout-like structures that end in a globular knob called a pollen presenter. Together, the mass of styles look a lot like pins bristling from a “pincushion”, a similarity that has given rise to the popular name for this genus.







Leucospermum comprises some forty-eight species, of which all but three are endemic to South Africa’s Cape Province. Flowering time is generally winter through late spring. Unlike flowers of the genus Protea, which rely on their showy bracts for visual appeal, leucospermum put all their art into the colors of the flowers themselves as well as the flowing shape of each curving component. These fanciful blooms atop sturdy stems create colorful focal points not only in the field but when displayed in floral designs.





Tuesday, February 18, 2020

Leucadendron Heaven


At the height of winter, the leucadendron fields in Rainbow are immersed in botanical splendor. The flowering bracts from a stunning array of species and cultivars flutter through the air like butterflies in search of sweet nectar, floral displays are created in an attempt to embody the landscapes’ beauty, and hints of spring seem to appear around every hillside.







These barometers of the season begin to emerge as winter settles in, blooming from the cold days of January all the way through May. Though often known as "conebush" due to their colorful nuts, leucadendron are considered the foliage side of the Protea Family. Most Leucadendron are indigenous to South Africa, though some varieties have been found in Australia and New Zealand as well. Around 80 known species and countless subspecies and cultivars exist, and all share the same emphasis: the beauty of their foliage. The colorful petals of the leucadendron are called bracts or modified leaves, and the true flower is the cone nestled among their bracts.



Leucadendron Maui Sunset


Leucadendron Senorita


Leucadendron Safari Tricolor


Leucadendron Red Thumb


Leucadendron Candles


Leucadendron Inca Gold


Sunday, February 9, 2020

In the Field: Leucadendron Ebony


Proteas are the ‘extraordinary’ something that can change nearly everything. From bouquets of fresh-cut flowers to elaborate arrangements, each inspires a burst of floral bliss and a lot of drama (the good kind). With the season’s abundance of Leucadendron scattered throughout the fields, we turn to a ‘newbie’ here on the farm.


Leucadendron Ebony or also called Burgundy Sunset. It’s stunning and mesmerizing! This Leucadendron was named because of its dark-purple leaf color. But when Ebony blooms in winter, the bracts that surround the ‘true flower’ turn a bright burgundy red. This year’s display is rich and intense. SO. Beautiful.




And for a little history… Ebony is thought to be a combination of Leucadendron Safari Sunset, laureolum and salignum red. This amazing plant was discovered in 2007 in a field of Leucadendron Safari Sunset near Auckland, New Zealand.

It’s no secret that we think this fabulous Leucadendron should definitely be receiving more LOVE from florists and designers for its wonderful foliage and… gorgeous winter flowers!





Thursday, January 30, 2020

January Articles of Interest

Yes, native plants can flourish after bushfire.
But there’s only so much hardship they can take...


In a fire-blackened landscape, signs of life are everywhere. A riot of red and green leaves erupt from an otherwise dead-looking tree trunk, and the beginnings of wildflowers and grasses peek from the crunchy charcoal below.

Much Australian flora has evolved to cope with fire, recovering by re-sprouting or setting seed. However, some plants are sensitive to fire, especially when fires are frequent or intense, and these species need our help to recover.


Read more here.
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The Five Habits of Highly Creative People


You know the one who’s always inspiring? She brings interesting points to light in team meetings, aces every task at hand, and energizes the company with her innovative strategies and ideas. Or maybe the creative person you look up to is an old friend with a serious penchant for interior decoration. It could be your culinary-talented father, a local artist, or your favorite author or motivational speaker. Whoever they are, you're always left marveling at not only the vision, but the orchestration and end result, too.

Read more here.
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Flowers as a Gift are Connecting People Emotionally
and are Straightening their Relationships


People are sharing different kinds of gifts with their loved ones, but flowers are still found to be the most impressive gifts by a study. According to the study conducted by Rutgers University, every gift we offer to someone holds a secret message. The study has also found that the gift we choose, especially flowers, affects both the sender and receiver.

Flowers as a gift are viewed by the receivers as more successful, caring and emotional as compared to the other types of gifts. An exchange of flowers between men and women makes them happy and loving people. The study has also found that flowers emotionally connect two people to understand each other’s feeling.


Read more here.

Monday, January 27, 2020

Winter Gatherings


Have you ever watched a chef peruse his vegetable garden, getting excited while scrutinizing the fresh herbs and veggies that will later be used to create a fabulous meal? That's me with flowers. I'm most in my realm when I'm surrounded by seasonal blooms and foliage, visualizing the array of bouquets and arrangements I could create. Usually, I start by considering things like color, texture, shape and size when I’m picking flowers, and I never know what I’ll end up with until I’m finished!


In the case of this arrangement, I was immediately drawn to the vibrant winter colors of the Leucadendron contrasted with the sweet pink hues of the Protea and Grevillea. Since the Banksia Candles and Grevillea flowers were similar in texture, I added a few stems of Protea nitida to create a unique, exotic feel. Nitida also brings a new shape to the mix without veering to far from my chosen palette. Finally, the Banksia’s piney, green foliage complements both the Protea and Leucadendron’s texture injecting an organic looseness to the design. I'm enchanted with how it turned out, and even more importantly I had a wonderful time gathering the flowers and creating it!